Perfect Scrambled Eggs

Perfect Scrambled Eggs Def

Scrambled eggs on toast, one of our favourite comfort foods. Almost everyone has an opinion about the best way to make them and our final egg-themed post of the month gives students the chance to share theirs. Before that, they use the information in the infographic above to write the instructions for making scrambled eggs English-style or French-style and then compare with the method suggested by Jamie Oliver in the video below.

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes


How to Boil an Egg

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As egg lovers, we were delighted to read recently that eggs have been taken off the nutritional blacklist. So we’ve come up with this egg-themed lesson to pay tribute to one of the most nourishing foods you can eat. We begin by looking at vocabulary related to describing and preparing eggs. We then go back to cooking basics and watch Britain’s bestselling cookery writer, Delia Smith, making soft and hard-boiled eggs. Throughout the lesson, there are lots of opportunities for students to talk about their experiences of eggs, or should we say eggsperiences?

Click here for the video.

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes

 


Be Wonderful and Wise

 Our first post of the autumn term is based on an advert containing an assortment of food and cooking vocabulary, ranging from the familiar to the almost certainly unknown, unless students have spent hours in front of the TV watching Masterchef in English. Activities include observing, listening, vocabulary development, speaking, and to finish off, a song – if you haven’t had enough of it by then. All together now – chop, chop,chop,chop, chopping…….

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes


Food for Thought at TESOL Spain 2013

Thank you to the TESOL Spain team for organizing a great conference. As usual, I wish I could have split myself into two or more parts to get to all the talks I wanted to….

Here’s the handout for my talk. Thanks to everyone who came – I hope you enjoy using the activities.


Beef Wellington

This lesson is based on a clip from the Gordon Ramsay TV show The F Word.

About a year ago, Jamie Keddie of the excellent Lessonstream pointed me in the direction of this clip when he was writing for the TeachingEnglish website. As soon as I saw it, I knew I had to use it in class; it just seemed made for exploiting in the ELT classroom. Have a look and see if you agree.

Since this programme was broadcast, Gordon Ramsay has updated the Beef Wellington recipe for Christmas. For homework, ask students to watch and note down the differences between the original and the Christmas version, and make one of them themselves. And that’s all from us for 2011. Enjoy the holidays and check back in the new year for the next update.

Beef Wellington Teacher’s Notes


Nigella Kitchen

We’ve noticed that one of the topics that always goes down well with our students is food, and this lesson is based on a clip from NIgella Lawson’s BBC series Kitchen. If you haven’t heard of Nigella Lawson, you can find out about her here.

The lesson begins with the students talking about their favourite room at home, and then they watch a short clip of Nigella talking about her favourite room. After that, we move on to a couple of listening activities – first, the dishes she cooks (chocolate peanut butter cheesecake, anyone?), and then the ingredients she uses. Watch your students’ reactions when she eats the prawn at the end of the clip! Next up is some vocabulary work, and finally a speaking activity using this vocabulary and more. We hope you and your students enjoy it.

Nigella Kitchen Student Worksheet

Nigella Kitchen Teacher’s Notes


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