A Brief Encounter with Grammar : I Wish

I wish A3 web

 

Main Activities Prediction, listening, grammar (wishes) and speaking.

Suitable for  Teens and adults, Pre-Advanced (B2.2) and above.

TEACHER’S NOTES    (Click here for a pdf of theTeacher’s Notes.)

STEP 1

Put students into groups of three or four. Tell them that they’re going to see a short extract from a film.

STEP 2

Show the film from 07:18 to 10:11.

Then ask them to discuss the following questions:

  • What’s happened to the woman?
  • What’s the relationship between the two women?
  • Is she glad that the other woman is keeping her company?

STEP 3

Get some theories from the groups and write them up on the board. Tell them that you’ll reveal the answer later.

STEP 4

Now see if anyone can answer this question: Which word did she use eight times? Hopefully, someone will come up with the answer “wish”.

STEP 5

Ask them if they can remember any of the things she said using it.

STEP 6

Show them the scene again, but don’t let them write as they watch. When they’ve seen it, ask them to complete the gaps in these sentences.

STEP 7

Let them decide if they’d like to see it one more time to check/improve their answers. Alternatively, play it again, pausing after each sentence.

STEP 8

Display or hand out the answers.

STEP 9

Ask them to divide the sentences (except 3 and 4) into two groups with different meanings and forms. They should decide what the meanings are and describe the rule for the form.

STEP 10

Display the first block of the infographic (either use the one above or click here for the first block only) so they can check their two groups and then reveal the second block, Groups 1 and 2, to see if they have come up with the same.

STEP 11

Now display the plot summary so they can see how close their theories were in step 3.

STEP 12

Ask how she feels about the affair. Does she regret it or not?

STEP 13

Display the third block of the infographic, True or False?. Ask the class to vote on whether the sentences are true or false. Then play the video from 09:27-10:11 again. (This shows that the first one is obviously false – the other two are debatable.)

STEP 14

Now ask them to make a third group for “wish” that describes the structure and meaning for these last three examples. They should come up with something like wish + past perfect verb form, used to express regret about the past.

STEP 15

Finally, reveal the fourth block of the infographic, Over to You, and ask students to complete the stem sentences with true desires, complaints and regrets of their own.

STEP 16

Get students to sit in groups of three, read their sentences to each other and then explain and comment.

 


I Forgot my Phone

Mobile Phones?

Mobile Phones? by Tim Ellis is licensed under CCBY2.0

Main Activities  Vocabulary acquisition, word formation, talking about mobile phone use

Suitable for  Pre-Advanced (B2.2) teens and adults.

We’re moving on to a “mobile” theme this month on the blog and this first post is designed to encourage students to push at the boundaries of their vocabulary and to think about word form as tested in exams such as the First Certificate and Advanced. Thanks to our colleague Nikki for the heads-up on this beautiful and thought-provoking short film about how much those little phones have taken over our lives.

TEACHER’S NOTES    (Click here for a pdf version)

STEP 1

Divide the class into two large groups – A and B. Then, within each group, form pairs so that all As are working with another A and vice-versa. Tell them that they’re going to hear the audio from a short piece of video. They have to guess the different places and events from what they hear. Some are more obvious than others and they’ll need to use their imaginations. Play the video (sound only) and stop at the following points, asking the students to write down what they think is happening and where:

a. 00:10          e. 01:00          i. 01:30

b. 00:24          f. 01:05           j. 01:50

c. 00:43          g. 01:09           k. 02:03

d. 00:51          h. 01:22

STEP 2

Once all the pairs have written their agreed suggestions, hand out the A/B answer sheet to the two large groups. Give them time to look up words/phrases for pronunciation or meaning using dictionaries or mobiles as they’ll have to tell a partner the answer in a moment.

STEP 3

Make A/B pairs. Each person has the answers that the other one is missing. They take it in turns to read each other their suggestions from step 1 and then to hear the answer from their partner.

STEP 4

Tell them that the protagonist of the video is annoyed by a similar thing in all of the scenes described. Ask them to guess with their partner what it might be.

STEP 5

Now show them the video to see if they guessed correctly.

STEP 6

Keep the students in the same A/B pairs. Tell them that you’re going to give them this sheet with 11 sentences describing the people with the mobiles. In each sentence, similar to the FCE/CAE word formation exercise, there is a word missing. To fill the gap, they must use the appropriate version of the word given in bold at the end of the sentence. Note that two of the words don’t need to be changed at all, and one is not the base word, as in the Cambridge exam. They get one point for each correct answer but only if the spelling is perfect!

STEP 7

Now regroup the class into groups of three and ask them to discuss the questions below the 11 sentences. Encourage people to ask questions for vocabulary etc. and make your own notes on interesting errors or nice language, for example. Write everything up on the board and allow some time to go through it at the end of their discussion.

STEP 8

Tell students not to take notes. Finish by telling them that they’re going to use their mobiles for something positive and then ask them to stand up and take a photo of the board. Ask them to write up their own notes, either in their notebooks or on their computer, using the photo. Bring them in, or print them out for the next day to compare how they’ve organised the information.


How to Boil an Egg

Screen Shot 2014-03-30 at 14.23.02

As egg lovers, we were delighted to read recently that eggs have been taken off the nutritional blacklist. So we’ve come up with this egg-themed lesson to pay tribute to one of the most nourishing foods you can eat. We begin by looking at vocabulary related to describing and preparing eggs. We then go back to cooking basics and watch Britain’s bestselling cookery writer, Delia Smith, making soft and hard-boiled eggs. Throughout the lesson, there are lots of opportunities for students to talk about their experiences of eggs, or should we say eggsperiences?

Click here for the video.

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes

 


Multiple Choice – an Urban Legend

What do you do if oversleep and miss the start of an exam? If you’re anything like the three hapless characters in this short film, you come up with an excuse and hope your teacher falls for it. Based on a short film, which in turn is inspired by an urban legend that many of you will have heard, this lesson starts off with discussion about the topic of exams. Students then watch the film, which should provide them with lots of opportunities to increase their range of vocabulary, both exam and non-exam related.

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes


Mr Foley

This lesson is all about sound. Students see a clip in which a Foley artist explains how she made the sounds of a dinosaur hatching in Jurassic Park, and then they watch an award-winning short film in which a patient wakes up in hospital to find that his life is being soundtracked by two Foley artists and a string quartet. Throughout the lesson, there are lots of opportunities for both sound and non-sound related vocabulary to come up.

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes.

Collage 1

photo-7

Image made using photos taken from http://flickr.com/eltpics by @mkofab, @esolcourses, @sandymillin, @aClilToClimb used under a CC Attribution Non-Commercial license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/


Storytelling at TESOL Spain 2013

Had a great time in Sevilla this weekend and all credit to the organisers of TESOL Spain for a fantastic conference.  And special thanks to all the people who came to my talk, both this weekend and in Madrid last month. You know who you are! This is a slightly shorter version but it includes all the main points and is my first experiment with PresentMe so comments welcome…

https://present.me/embed/53450-storytelling-presentme-version


Food for Thought at TESOL Spain 2013

Thank you to the TESOL Spain team for organizing a great conference. As usual, I wish I could have split myself into two or more parts to get to all the talks I wanted to….

Here’s the handout for my talk. Thanks to everyone who came – I hope you enjoy using the activities.


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