How to Boil an Egg

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As egg lovers, we were delighted to read recently that eggs have been taken off the nutritional blacklist. So we’ve come up with this egg-themed lesson to pay tribute to one of the most nourishing foods you can eat. We begin by looking at vocabulary related to describing and preparing eggs. We then go back to cooking basics and watch Britain’s bestselling cookery writer, Delia Smith, making soft and hard-boiled eggs. Throughout the lesson, there are lots of opportunities for students to talk about their experiences of eggs, or should we say eggsperiences?

Click here for the video.

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes

 


Multiple Choice – an Urban Legend

What do you do if oversleep and miss the start of an exam? If you’re anything like the three hapless characters in this short film, you come up with an excuse and hope your teacher falls for it. Based on a short film, which in turn is inspired by an urban legend that many of you will have heard, this lesson starts off with discussion about the topic of exams. Students then watch the film, which should provide them with lots of opportunities to increase their range of vocabulary, both exam and non-exam related.

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes


Mr Foley

This lesson is all about sound. Students see a clip in which a Foley artist explains how she made the sounds of a dinosaur hatching in Jurassic Park, and then they watch an award-winning short film in which a patient wakes up in hospital to find that his life is being soundtracked by two Foley artists and a string quartet. Throughout the lesson, there are lots of opportunities for both sound and non-sound related vocabulary to come up.

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes.

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Image made using photos taken from http://flickr.com/eltpics by @mkofab, @esolcourses, @sandymillin, @aClilToClimb used under a CC Attribution Non-Commercial license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/


Storytelling at TESOL Spain 2013

Had a great time in Sevilla this weekend and all credit to the organisers of TESOL Spain for a fantastic conference.  And special thanks to all the people who came to my talk, both this weekend and in Madrid last month. You know who you are! This is a slightly shorter version but it includes all the main points and is my first experiment with PresentMe so comments welcome…

https://present.me/embed/53450-storytelling-presentme-version


Food for Thought at TESOL Spain 2013

Thank you to the TESOL Spain team for organizing a great conference. As usual, I wish I could have split myself into two or more parts to get to all the talks I wanted to….

Here’s the handout for my talk. Thanks to everyone who came – I hope you enjoy using the activities.


The Tipping Point

Hello again everyone and we apologise for our prolonged absence! We hit the ground running in mid-September but we’re finally on top of things and are resuming normal service. In fact, our first post of the new academic year has shades of irony, given that the subject is tipping – something generally associated with good service! On introducing this topic in class, we discovered that not only is it quite contentious but that it’s also much misunderstood in terms of who actually gets the money and why. There are also huge variations between countries and cultures. Among other things, we’re using a video from the excellent Videojug site – a great source of inspiration for videos for class. We hope you enjoy it and that it gives you food for thought the next time you get the bill in a restaurant…..

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes.


Evolution

I came across this short video while reading the paper, clicked on it and was strangely mesmerised. I found it beautiful and compelling but at the same time very thought-provoking. I then discovered two more things: firstly, that I was one of the few people on the planet still unaware of its existence and secondly, that not all people felt it was as pure and innocent as I did. The exercise also makes use of the online comments on the article in the paper, which is something I think is a brilliant resource for vocabulary and discussion.
Click here for the Teacher’s Notes.


Inside Every Good Dog

Horace by Rob Stringer

During first day “getting to know you” activities in my classes, the subject of dogs usually comes up. Like many teachers, I bring in photos related to my life for one reason or another and ask students to guess the connection. One of the photos is of a dog. After establishing that it’s the dog I would have if I were to get a dog, I ask students who has a dog, who likes dogs etc., and more often than not, dog owners and dog lovers make up the majority of the class. And that’s the topic of dogs done and dusted. We move on to the next photo, I make a mental note to get more mileage out of dogs, and never get round to it. Until now.

This lesson is based on an advert for Purina, a pet food company, which may make the dog lovers in your class have a “cute attack” or even go a little bit misty-eyed! The lesson starts by exploiting the the song used in the advert , then the images, and finishes off with a ranking activity and some conversation. All the way through, there are lots of opportunities to use both canine and non-canine related vocabulary.

Click here for the Teacher’s Notes..


Eye in the Sky

Joe Cocker’s version of  “With a little help from my friends” is widely considered by music critics to be the greatest-ever cover version. For our first post of 2012, we ‘ve gone for a radical revision of “Eye in the Sky” by Noa, she of the hauntingly beautiful voice. The original, of course, was by The Alan Parsons Project. Which will your class prefer? There’s also a lovely lead-in to see how much attention you and your students actually pay to the lyrics of your favourite songs…

Eye In The Sky Teacher’s Notes


Steve’s Talk at TESOL France

Thanks to everyone who came to my talk. As promised, here’s the handout:

Tried and Tested TESOL France


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